Principles of Anatomy & Physiology

Discussions on The Human Body

Is my essay good enough for UC prompt 1? Please read and criticize.?

During my community college years, I have changed my major a few times. However, my interest has always been in the medical field. Finally, I decided to pursue my education in Biology. With a BS in Biology, I hope to reach my goal of becoming a professor.
My interest in the subject developed after visiting India for a few years. While I was there, I studied in the medical field with three main subjects which were physics, chemistry, and biology. Biology was a subject that I disliked but, to my surprise, I looked forward to this interesting class everyday and was excited to learn. I’ve always thought biology careers have to do with organisms and nature. Little did I know that the body systems, like endocrine, nervous, skeletal, and other body systems, are also a part of this subject. Being fascinated by the human body, I realized that biology is my desired major. Taking a biology class has helped me tremendously as I have learnt that it is a very diverse and wide field with many options.
Although I’d like to teach at the university level, I volunteer each week as a tutor for elementary to high school students. MEND is a volunteer organization to help children from low income families succeed in education. I assist the students in their homework or any other educational activity, like playing monopoly or guessing flashcards. Some of these students don’t study biology yet while others study environmental science. However, I enjoy helping every student with any subject. This work helps me gain teaching experience and allows me to teach at different grade levels.
I have not yet taken many biology courses in my current college. With many prerequisites to satisfy, I haven’t gotten the chance to take courses of my choice. However, I study biology books with much interest. I believe getting a bachelor’s degree is a great step towards a rewarding career.

What do you think of my personal statement essay for UC prompt 1?

Q: What is your intended major? Discuss how your interest in the subject developed and describe any experience you have had in the field — such as volunteer work, internships and employment, participation in student organizations and activities — and what you have gained from your involvement.

During my community college years, I have changed my major a few times. However, my interest has always been in the medical field. Finally, I decided to pursue my education in Biology. With a BS in Biology, I hope to reach my goal of becoming a professor.
My interest in the subject developed after visiting India for a few years. While I was there, I studied in the medical field with three main subjects which were physics, chemistry, and biology. Biology was a subject that I disliked but, to my surprise, I looked forward to this interesting class everyday and was excited to learn. I’ve always thought biology careers have to do with organisms and nature. Little did I know that the body systems, like endocrine, nervous, skeletal, and other body systems, are also a part of this subject. Being fascinated by the human body, I realized that biology is my desired major. Taking a biology class has helped me tremendously as I have learnt that it is a very diverse and wide field with many options.
Although I’d like to teach at the university level, I volunteer each week as a tutor for elementary to high school students. MEND is a volunteer organization to help children from low income families succeed in education. I assist the students in their homework or any other educational activity, like playing monopoly or guessing flashcards. Some of these students don’t study biology yet while others study environmental science. However, I enjoy helping every student with any subject. This work helps me gain teaching experience and allows me to teach at different grade levels.
I have not yet taken many biology courses in my current college. With many prerequisites to satisfy, I haven’t gotten the chance to take courses of my choice. However, I study biology books with much interest. I believe getting a bachelor’s degree is a great step towards a rewarding career.

I’m trying to apply to UC Merced.

quick multiple choice question AP Bio read below?

ANSWER 1,3,4 CITE SOURCES… post link to website? if its from book say what book and type that sentence that supports your answer or if you know it for sure EXPLAIN IT?? try to support your answer! cuz we haven’t covered those materials yet so ya…. thanks!!!

1. The major difference between cartilage and bone is that cartilage
a. is a part of the skeletal system
b. is composed of collagen and salts
c. lacks blood vessels and nerves
d. secretes a rubbery matrix
e. is a type of connective tissue

2. All of the following are examples of events that can prevent interspecific breeding EXCEPT:
a. the potential mates do not meet
b. the potential mates experience behavioral isolation
c. the potential mates have different courtship rituals
d. the potential mates have similar breeding seasons
e. the gamets of potential mates have biochemical differences
(ok I think its d….. ya like we are only half way through the material but he gave us ap bio rev questions to do to prepare for the ap test… and I remeber this from bio not ap I think it’s d… ya…but too lazy to delete this question)

3. In woody dicots, primary xylem and phloem cells are replaced by secondary xylem and phloem cells that arise from the
a. apical meristem
b. epidermis
c. vascular cambium
d. cork cambium
e. lenticels

4. During the period when life is believed to have begun, the atmosphere on primitive Earth contained abundant amoutns of all the following gases EXCEPT
a. oxygen
b. hydrogen
c. ammonia
d. methane
e. water

Homework help for science?

Okay so im doing my homework thats due tomorrow, and i got stuck. Im in 7th grade science and im confused.
Okay the question is:
Which is a job of the Skeletal system? circle the letter(s) of the correct answer.
A. Making blood cells
B. Carrying materials to and from cells
C. Covering the body

Thanks everyone and YES you can circle more than one.
I just need help cause i tried looking it op online and i couldnt find it, and i forgot to take my book home.
thanks

Please Plz I Really Need Urhelp With Summarising This Interview

i really need to get it done in the next couple of weeks but im kind of paranoid about it and its abit confusing becuse they talk about diffrent cultures, is there any chance you can help me?http://www.stayfreemagazine.org/archives…
Ever have the nagging feeling that our celebrity-driven, sound bite society is making us into a stupid, cynical, shallow people? Well, look to Oliver James, author of a May 2000 article in The Ecologist titled “Consuming Misery: Across the World, the Richer a Nation Gets, the More Unhappy Its People Become.”
As a critic of consumer culture, I did a double take when I saw that headline–evidence at last! In his book Britain on the Couch, James purports that our way of wealth lowers our levels of serotonin–which he calls the happiness brain chemical–thereby making us depressed. James is far from alone in equating advanced capitalism with mental illness. Here in the United States, a growing movement of therapist-activists battles “affluenza,” defined as a debilitating mental state caused by having too much money. While much of the affluenza literature makes a certain kind of sense, all it takes is a cross-cultural perspective to see the problem with arguing that affluence causes depression–namely, it’s not true.
All of this is a roundabout way of introducing Lawrence Kirmayer. Dr. Kirmayer is a highly respected cultural psychiatrist at McGill University in Quebec. Unlike the affluenza crowd, Kirmayer has done a great deal of research on the mental health of aboriginal peoples, immigrants, and refugees. He points out that although our capitalist ways may be emotionally hazardous, it’s unlikely that we are more depressed than poorer cultures. The only way to know for sure is to study those cultures, and research is generally lacking.
Stay Free! talked to Kirmayer by phone in July 2003 about cross-culture mental illness more broadly. We found him to be a very nice man. –Carrie McLaren
STAY FREE!: What mental problems are the most similar across cultures?
KIRMAYER: At one pole you have organic disorders that are very similar across cultures, like Alzheimer’s disease or epilepsy, and perhaps schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. And at the other end you have what used to be called hysteria–dissociative disorders and so on. That said, there are differences cross-culturally even for something like schizophrenia. For example, people with schizophrenia appear to do better in nonurbanized, nonindustrialized countries.
STAY FREE!: Why is that?
KIRMAYER: It’s not really clear, but it’s probably in part because urban environments are not good for people vulnerable to schizophrenia.
STAY FREE!: Is that unique to schizophrenia or is that the case for mental illness in general?
KIRMAYER: Well, different illnesses don’t respond precisely the same way to environmental and social factors. There are probably distinctive processes that underlie schizophrenia. The impact of noisy environments, for example, has been shown to contribute to relapse. One theory why people with schizophrenia do better in some countries has to do with family support and social integration. Someone who hallucinates is going to have a hard time working in a very technological society, but in a rural agrarian society they may still be able to do something useful for the family and community.
STAY FREE!: Do the symptoms of schizophrenia vary in different cultures?
KIRMAYER: Well, there have been studies that have shown differences in the frequency of various symptoms. For example, symptoms of catatonia–people becoming immobile–are more prevalent in some developing countries than they are in the West. Certain bodily symptoms are also more prevalent in some places. In many parts of the world, people with hallucinations may understand their experience in terms of religious systems–they may see themselves as being possessed, or talking to God. You get that in the West too, but you also have common technological interpretations–they think there is a radio transmitter in their tooth and so on.
STAY FREE!: I’ve read that TV stations get a lot of phone calls from people with schizophrenia and manic depression telling them to stop broadcasting.
KIRMAYER: Yeah, that’s a common symptom of psychosis. People will go through this process of trying to figure out, “What could possibly explain this strange feeling that I’m having?” Most of the explanations sanctioned by medicine are basically that you have a “chemical imbalance” and that is very deflating. In another society, you might be told that you have had a significant religious experience, and even though you might still need to get some help, there might be something to valorize what’s gone on for you. That tradeoff is harder in a very scientistic culture. Of course, even in our culture, where people are very secular and talk about things in scientific terms, there are still a lot of moral ideas about the person and about self-control.
STAY FREE!: People say, “Get over it!”
KIRMAYER: Exactly.
STAY FREE!: If someone has symptoms that we associate with depression in the U.S., how might that problem differ in other cultures?
KIRMAYER: There are two sets of issues. There is the issue of what is actually going on for people and the issue of how they understand it. These issues don’t necessarily have to match up perfectly, but they interact. People interpret what’s going on differently based on their cultural background. In the case of something like depression, how you interpret symptoms influences how things unfold. If you decide these feelings of exhaustion are a sign of depression, then that diagnosis suggests that you have certain other problems. That becomes part of a feedback loop–your thoughts chase each other in circles, and that in itself can intensify depression. Even though we can distinguish between what goes on physiologically and socially, the two levels interact. Once you understand that, you can find something that looks like depression everywhere in the world. In most places, the physical symptoms are the most important part of depression: fatigue, difficulty concentrating, muscular, and skeletal aches and pains and so on. In Japan, a lot of middle-aged women complain of shoulder pain, which is unusual in North America. The name for it is futeishuso which means “nonspecific complaint.” Some of those people may actually have depression, but nobody’s asked them, “Do you feel sad or low? Do you feel hopeless?”
STAY FREE!: Because there’s a stigma attached?
KIRMAYER: Partly, yes, and partly because the notion of depression has not been so salient in Japanese psychiatry. Notions of anxiety disorders have been much more common. Psychiatrists don’t see people with anxiety and depression, anyway–doctors of internal medicine deal with those patients. Psychiatrists only deal with the most severe disorders, schizophrenia and so forth. Until about five years ago or so there were no SSRI medications in Japan. Eli Lilly didn’t even try to introduce Prozac in Japan initially because they thought there would be no market. Finally another pharmaceutical company did try, and now the idea of depression has taken off.
STAY FREE!: How does the notion that depression is a biological condition affect the course of the illness? Are people in the West better or worse off for it?
KIRMAYER: It depends. There’s a Japanese psychiatrist, Yutako Ono, who used to tell people, “Depression is like pneumonia, so you have to take your medicine to make it go away.” The implication is that it’s not chronic. You can certainly promote an image of a mental disorder that is curable even if it is biological.
STAY FREE!: But here it seems that the biological notion implies permanence.
KIRMAYER: Well, but that kind of determinism is not necessarily tied to biology. In American folk psychology, there are notions of character, which imply that someone is or is not a particular way. In the U.S. over the past few years, there has been a huge swing away from the idea that people are molded by their social environment. Instead, there’s the assumption that everything is determined by one’s constitution. Sometimes it’s rooted in genetics, sometimes something’s wrong with the brain. The whole biological turn in psychiatry was really in excess of any specific evidence, but I think that it fits well with conservative politics in the U.S. right now.
STAY FREE!: I’ve heard that people in more affluent nations are more often treated for mental illnesses like depression than people in nations of low or moderate wealth. So does this mean that there is more mental illness in affluent places or is it just a consequence of poor people not having access to mental health care?
KIRMAYER: I think it’s mostly the latter, though in many cases we don’t know because there aren’t enough epidemiological studies. If you want to make a generalization, then it’s probably safe to say that poor countries have more mental-health problems, but by saying “poor” nowadays, you often mean societies where there is a huge level of conflict and violence. So it’s not simply poverty–you can have a small, well-integrated rural society where people don’t have a lot of material goods but they have excellent mental health.
STAY FREE!: Do people in different cultures commit suicide for different reasons?
KIRMAYER: Yes. Of course, the overriding reason, which is common across cultures, is overwhelming hopelessness and the desire to escape suffering. But there are also socially sanctioned reasons that can valorize suicide; in traditional Japan, suicide was a way of maintaining honor. To some extent, this is still a factor. People who have financial reversals will commit suicide not just to escape the problem but to make a gesture that acknowledges responsibility and hence restores honor in some way. Some of that’s been exaggerated. There’s been a stock image of the Inuit [the indigenous peoples of the arctic formerly called the Eskimo] as having a tradition of altruistic suicide in which older people sacrifice themselves for younger people. Granted, there were situations in which a whole family was starving and an elder would volunteer to be left behind. But that’s a kind of self-sacrifice that people from many cultures could understand if they were facing similarly desperate circumstance so I’m not sure that should be viewed as suicide.
STAY FREE!: Has any interesting work been done on social stereotypes? Like the idea that Eastern European Jews are more neurotic?
KIRMAYER: The cultural historian Sandor Gilman has written a lot about the stereotype of the neurotic Jew. For the most part, it’s not true–everybody’s neurotic. But we have different styles of expression. Woody Allen isn’t more neurotic than other people, but he has made a career out of talking about his anxieties. Spalding Gray is equally expressive of his self-doubt and anxiety but with a different cultural flavor. You find huge variations in how open people are about expressing things–these aren’t just stereotypes, they are real cultural differences. But even though there are, for instance, certain Asian cultures where people don’t express things verbally in the way some Mediterranean or North American groups would, it doesn’t mean they aren’t experiencing those things. Of course, within each social group you find enormous variation, and it’s easy to overestimate the importance of any cultural trait.
STAY FREE!: Scholars who study “subjective well-being” argue that Latin Americans and North Americans are happier than Asians. Is there any truth to this?
KIRMAYER: Well, this relates to what I was saying: how people narrate their own experience will be influenced by culture. Happiness is a particular cultural value. In North America, it is important to indicate your success by exclaiming your happiness. In many other cultural contexts, however, people don’t view the point of life as being happy; they may view it as being productive, as being honorable, as being a contributing member to society or to a family. I think the idea that we should be happy is a particularly American value. It fits very well with consumer capitalism, where the route to happiness is the consumption of products. It’s certainly possible that the strategies someone uses to pursue well-being (such as through economic productivity) have built into them inevitable unhappiness, but we’re not really encouraged to question our value system.

I Read The Books My Notes, But Still Need Help..!!!help Me Please….if You Dont Know The Asnwer Dont Answer.?

1: The skin is a waterproof covering that ________.
cushions our internal organs
prevents entry of harmful microorganisms
prevents dehydration
helps regulate our body temperature and maintains homeostasis
all of the above
2: The _________ provides external protection to the body and is the largest organ of the ________ system.
endoskeleton; skeletal
skin; integumentary
subcutaneous tissues; skin
cartilage; skeletal
none of the above
3: Osteoporosis is _________.
the build-up of calcium in the bones of the body
the loss of calcium from the bones of the body
a condition in which the bones become brittle and porous
both B and C
none of the above
4: Skin cells divide and multiply in the __________.
epidermis
osteoclasts
dermis
subcutaneous tissues
all of the above
5: The _________ glands produce oil that lubricates the skin.
sweat
sudoriferous
subcutaneous
sebaceous
none of the above
6: Most skeletal muscles are found in _______ pairs, meaning that as one ________, the other relaxes.
antagonistic; contracts
metacarpal; stretches
flexible; bends
skeletal; pushes
none of the above
7: Cartilage is gradually replaced by bone in a process called __________.
mitosis
ossification
dehydration
homeostasis
none of the above
8: Bone-forming cells called osteoblasts add _________ to the bones, making them harder.
keratin
acetylcholine
air
calcium
none of the above
9: The skull is connected to the spine by a _________ joint, a type of __________ joint.
pivot; synovial
ball-and-socket; synovial
hinge; gliding
gliding; flexible
none of the above
10: The most flexible type of joint of the body is the ___________.
phalanges
pivot joint
carpal joints
ball-and-socket joint
all of the above

Anatomy/physiology Books?

Does anybody know any good books about the human anatomy and physiology? I’d like one (or several) that cover at least one of the organ systems (e.g. skeletal, muscular, nervous etc.). If you can, please post a link to a site that sells it, so that I can check it out for myself.
Also, if possible, could you include a ‘level rating’ by each book, either beginner, intermediate or expert. Thanks!

Help! Human Biology Changes In Blood Flow?

for each part of the body listed below explain the reasons for any changes in blood flow that occur during exercise
skeletal muscle
digestive system(stomach, intestines, liver)
kidneys
brain
skin
heart muscle
other organs
im sorry but ive looked all through my human
biology book and cant find anything. please help me.

Whos Better Super Man Or Spider Man?

for each part of the body listed below explain the reasons for any changes in blood flow that occur during exercise
skeletal muscle
digestive system(stomach, intestines, liver)
kidneys
brain
skin
heart muscle
other organs
im sorry but ive looked all through my human
biology book and cant find anything. please help me.

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